Rebuilding a destroyed city during war

The fact that the reconstruction efforts have already begun, even before the war has ended, is a testament to the resilience of the Ukrainian people.

Words by

Camiel Mudde

© Camiel Mudde | Rebuilding a destroyed city during war

On February 24, 2022, the Saltivka district on the outskirts of the eastern Ukrainian city of Kharkiv was bombed by the Russians. This district, which was Kharkiv’s largest residential area and had over 300,000 inhabitants before the war, suffered extensive damage.

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© Camiel Mudde | Rebuilding a destroyed city during war
© Camiel Mudde | Rebuilding a destroyed city during war

Built during the Soviet era, the Saltivka district was designed for maximum comfort, with amenities like schools located within the inner courtyards of high-rise buildings. More than 4,000 buildings in Kharkiv were damaged, with a third of them directly hit. 

© Camiel Mudde | Rebuilding a destroyed city during war
© Camiel Mudde | Rebuilding a destroyed city during war

Since May, the city of Kharkiv has initiated the repair and reconstruction of houses. Windows have been replaced, and roofs have been repaired, primarily with the goal of preserving the homes for the eventual return of residents when it becomes safe. Currently, around 200 residents have returned to their homes in the Saltivka district, and several apartment buildings have been reconnected to the electricity and heating networks. 

© Camiel Mudde | Rebuilding a destroyed city during war
© Camiel Mudde | Rebuilding a destroyed city during war

The fact that the reconstruction efforts have already begun, even before the war has ended, is a testament to the resilience of the Ukrainian people. It highlights their determination to rebuild and restore their cities despite the challenges they face. 


About
Camiel Mudde, a 21-year-old photographer from the Netherlands, graduated from the University of Applied Photography in Rotterdam in 2022. Despite his age, Camiel is resolute in his pursuit of covering (inter)national news and social issues. Guided by his passion for photography and a deep curiosity about the human narrative have already led him to some intriguing places, where Camiel captures reality. The power of images to arouse emotions and tell stories has always fascinated Camiel. As a dedicated photojournalist, his mission is to employ this power to document crucial events and societal matters, sharing them with the world. 

More information

Rebuilding a destroyed city during war

The fact that the reconstruction efforts have already begun, even before the war has ended, is a testament to the resilience of the Ukrainian people.

Words by

Camiel Mudde

The fact that the reconstruction efforts have already begun, even before the war has ended, is a testament to the resilience of the Ukrainian people.
© Camiel Mudde | Rebuilding a destroyed city during war

On February 24, 2022, the Saltivka district on the outskirts of the eastern Ukrainian city of Kharkiv was bombed by the Russians. This district, which was Kharkiv’s largest residential area and had over 300,000 inhabitants before the war, suffered extensive damage.

© Camiel Mudde | Rebuilding a destroyed city during war
© Camiel Mudde | Rebuilding a destroyed city during war

Built during the Soviet era, the Saltivka district was designed for maximum comfort, with amenities like schools located within the inner courtyards of high-rise buildings. More than 4,000 buildings in Kharkiv were damaged, with a third of them directly hit. 

© Camiel Mudde | Rebuilding a destroyed city during war
© Camiel Mudde | Rebuilding a destroyed city during war

Since May, the city of Kharkiv has initiated the repair and reconstruction of houses. Windows have been replaced, and roofs have been repaired, primarily with the goal of preserving the homes for the eventual return of residents when it becomes safe. Currently, around 200 residents have returned to their homes in the Saltivka district, and several apartment buildings have been reconnected to the electricity and heating networks. 

© Camiel Mudde | Rebuilding a destroyed city during war
© Camiel Mudde | Rebuilding a destroyed city during war

The fact that the reconstruction efforts have already begun, even before the war has ended, is a testament to the resilience of the Ukrainian people. It highlights their determination to rebuild and restore their cities despite the challenges they face. 


About
Camiel Mudde, a 21-year-old photographer from the Netherlands, graduated from the University of Applied Photography in Rotterdam in 2022. Despite his age, Camiel is resolute in his pursuit of covering (inter)national news and social issues. Guided by his passion for photography and a deep curiosity about the human narrative have already led him to some intriguing places, where Camiel captures reality. The power of images to arouse emotions and tell stories has always fascinated Camiel. As a dedicated photojournalist, his mission is to employ this power to document crucial events and societal matters, sharing them with the world. 

More information

Rebuilding a destroyed city during war

The fact that the reconstruction efforts have already begun, even before the war has ended, is a testament to the resilience of the Ukrainian people.

Words by

Camiel Mudde

Rebuilding a destroyed city during war
© Camiel Mudde | Rebuilding a destroyed city during war

On February 24, 2022, the Saltivka district on the outskirts of the eastern Ukrainian city of Kharkiv was bombed by the Russians. This district, which was Kharkiv’s largest residential area and had over 300,000 inhabitants before the war, suffered extensive damage.

© Camiel Mudde | Rebuilding a destroyed city during war
© Camiel Mudde | Rebuilding a destroyed city during war

Built during the Soviet era, the Saltivka district was designed for maximum comfort, with amenities like schools located within the inner courtyards of high-rise buildings. More than 4,000 buildings in Kharkiv were damaged, with a third of them directly hit. 

© Camiel Mudde | Rebuilding a destroyed city during war
© Camiel Mudde | Rebuilding a destroyed city during war

Since May, the city of Kharkiv has initiated the repair and reconstruction of houses. Windows have been replaced, and roofs have been repaired, primarily with the goal of preserving the homes for the eventual return of residents when it becomes safe. Currently, around 200 residents have returned to their homes in the Saltivka district, and several apartment buildings have been reconnected to the electricity and heating networks. 

© Camiel Mudde | Rebuilding a destroyed city during war
© Camiel Mudde | Rebuilding a destroyed city during war

The fact that the reconstruction efforts have already begun, even before the war has ended, is a testament to the resilience of the Ukrainian people. It highlights their determination to rebuild and restore their cities despite the challenges they face. 


About
Camiel Mudde, a 21-year-old photographer from the Netherlands, graduated from the University of Applied Photography in Rotterdam in 2022. Despite his age, Camiel is resolute in his pursuit of covering (inter)national news and social issues. Guided by his passion for photography and a deep curiosity about the human narrative have already led him to some intriguing places, where Camiel captures reality. The power of images to arouse emotions and tell stories has always fascinated Camiel. As a dedicated photojournalist, his mission is to employ this power to document crucial events and societal matters, sharing them with the world. 

More information
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